The Garden of Ninfa, where history meets nature

The Garden of Ninfa is a place that looks like it’s been taken out of a fairy-tale. An amazing park that tells the story of a ghost city and a noble family who decided to bring it to life.

Garden on Ninfa TR

Ninfa was once a prosperous town on the Appian Way, property of the Caetani family: in the XIV century it was probably populated by 2000 people. Its names comes from the little temple dedicated to the nymphs during the Roman period built in this area, at the foot of the Lepini Hills. There were various churches-Santa Maria Maggiore was the primary one- mills and bridges, a castle and a town hall. It was defended by a double-walled fortification. The town was destroyed in 1382 due to politics and family events. It remained abandoned until the 20th century, when the estate was renovated and the garden was transformed by Gelasio Caetani.

Ninfa is now an English-style romantic garden with a river and a lake, where ruins and nature coexist harmoniously. There are trees and plants, which come from all over the world, together with ancient contrunctions, that show how the city used to be. It’s an open-air museum and a magic place surrounded by mountains and at about 20 kilometers from the sea.

Garden of Ninfa

Ninfa is located in the province of Latina, at 80 kilometers from Rome, and it is definitely worth a visit: it’s an experience you won’t forget. There’s a really strange atmosphere there: you can listen to nature and enjoy its beauty and sounds. If you have time, you can also visit the 17th-century “Hortus conclusus”, an Italian- style garden a the end of the Garden of Ninfa route, and the nearby towns Norma and Sermoneta.

Garden of Ninfa

The site is run by the Italian Foundation Roffredo Caetani and it is open to the public at set times from April to November.  Visitors are accompanied by a guide and entrance tickets must be purchased online. Don’t miss this jewel of Italy’s history and magnificence.

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