Five little secrets of Rome’s most famous sites you probably don’t know

Rome is one of the most famous and beautiful city in the world. It can surprise everyone, thanks to its history, art and unique places. But are you sure you know every little secret of its most visited monuments? Here you find five fun facts about the Eternal City.

  • Colosseum

It’s the symbol of the city, the breathtaking proof of the greatness of Ancient Rome. Once upon a time it was covered by marble, which was used to build the Saint Peter’s Basilica and other important buildings. The missing part, which gives it its  asymmetric profile, was destroyed by an eartquake in 851 a.c.

colosseo-gennaio

  • Piazza Navona

In Ancient Rome this amazing place was a oval-shaped stadium, built by the Emperor Domitian. It’s still possible to visit the ruins of the old structure. Sometimes ancient Romans would even flood the stadium and hold naval battles there: maybe that’s why now it’s called “Navona”, which means “big ship”.

  • Pantheon

The most captivating part of the Pantheon- it used to be a pagan temple, then transformed into a church- is its dome, with the hole, called oculus, in the top. Roman engineers built the dome lightening it as much as possible; its special structure doesn’t allow the rain to fall inside frequently. If it happens, the floor is slanted and drains the water.

pantheon-gennaio

  • Campo De’Fiori

Now it’s a delicious square, with reasturants and shops. But during the XVII century, executions used to be held publicly here. The famous philosophy Giordano Bruno was burnt alive in this place: that’s why now we find a monument dedicated to him.

  • Trevi Fountain

According to the legend, you have to throw  a coin with your right hand over your left shoulder to return to Rome. Almost every tourist who visits the fountain does it. But what happens to all the coins into the fountain? They are collected by Caritas, a Roman Catholic charity, to fund projects for poor people.

fontana-di-trevi-gennaio

 

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